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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

1 edition of Women in scientific and technological research in the European Community found in the catalog.

Women in scientific and technological research in the European Community

Women in scientific and technological research in the European Community

international workshop : proceedings

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Published by Commission of the European Communities in Brussels .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementeditors: H.A. Logue and L.M. Talapessy.
ContributionsLogue, Hugh A., Talapessy, Lily M., Commission of the European Communities.
The Physical Object
Pagination196p. ;
Number of Pages196
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20222108M

Europe's achievements in science and technology have been significant and research and development efforts form an integral part of the European economy. Europe has been the home of some of the most prominent researchers in various scientific disciplines, notably . Technological advances have also added an additional step to the review that many scientific articles undergo: image analysis. In , Woo Suk Hwang announced to the scientific community and the rest of the world that he had reached a milestone of biology — cloning a human embryonic stem cell.

The European Research Area is located in a scientific global arena. The issues of diversity within Europe and beyond its borders are too seldom raised in the discussion of opportunities in science and technology: this lack of diversity has to do with the imbalance in research opportunities in some regions of Europe, but also the questions of. Europe’s New Scientific Elite: Social Mechanisms of Science in the European Research Area (Public Intellectuals and the Sociology of Knowledge) - Kindle edition by Hoenig, Barbara. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Europe’s New Scientific Elite: Social Mechanisms of Science in Cited by: 8.

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Technology transfer, also called transfer of technology (TOT), is the process of transferring (disseminating) technology from the person or organization that owns or holds it to another person or organization. It occurs along various axes: among universities, from universities to businesses (and vice versa), from large businesses to smaller ones (and vice versa), from governments to businesses.


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Ettias, 1st School on European Training on Technologies and Industrial Applications of Superconductivity, Naples, Italy, 9-13 September 1991

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Women in scientific and technological research in the European Community Download PDF EPUB FB2

Women into Technology in the European Community, a University Enterprise Training Partnership (WITEC-UETP) established inis a European Network of partners working for the motivation, development and support of women in science, technology and by: 2.

However, in five EU Member States, the majority of scientists and engineers were women: Lithuania (57% female), Bulgaria and Latvia (both 53%), Portugal (51%) and Denmark (just over 50%). Less than one third of scientists and engineers were women in Hungary and Luxembourg (both 25%), Finland (29%), and Germany (33%).

Women are currently under-represented in this field: the aim is therefore to encourage women to take part in European research. To achieve this, efforts will have to be made at European and Member State level. Accordingly, the Commission will encourage discussion and the sharing of experience among the Member States.

WOMEN in Early Modern European SCIENCE: Maria Agnesi, Laura Bassi, Caroline Herschel, Mary Winkelmann Kirch, and Emilie du Chatelet. Since the beginning of time, women have played a vital role in the understanding of scientific processes.

It is scientific women through out the centuries that have shaped our understanding of scientific technology. EU Documents on Women and Science. This page contains official policy documents of the Council of Ministers of the European Union, of the European Parliament and Commission, as well as the reports of the different “women and science” expert groups established by the European Commission between The ‘Science in Society’ programme aims to stimulate a harmonious integration of scientific and technological endeavour and associated research policies in European society.

It encourages Europe-wide reflection and debate on science and technology and their relation with society and culture. The European Centre for Women and Technology was founded upon theinitiative of the International Taskforce of Women in ICT (ITF) constituted during the conference organized the June by Claudia Morrell, Director of the Center for Women in Technology (CWIT) at the University of Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

UK ASSET Survey SET (science, engineering, technology) professors. The survey received professor respondents (10% were women). 55% of women professors (75% of the men) agreed that their senior colleagues were suppor- tive.

55% of the women (77% of the men) felt socially integrated within their department. Women make up only 28% of the workforce in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), and men vastly outnumber women majoring in most STEM fields in college.

The gender gaps are particularly high in some of the fastest-growing and highest-paid jobs of the future, like computer science and engineering. In a number of cases, on the contrary, women have significantly higher success rates than men.

An example is the Dutch NWO, where, because of low representation of women in research, particular attention is paid to the quality of evaluation, and where promotion of women in research is an important policy goal. 18 She Figures — Gender in Research and Innovation.

The purpose of this chapter is to assess the presence of women in research in a cross-country perspective and set the context for the chapters that follow. It analyses the relative shares of women and men engaged in various forms of scientific Size: 4MB. This research was beyond the resourcing and scope of the FASTS Women in Science () project.

It is an omission readily acknowledged in international research on women in science (National Research Council, ; Hewlett et al., ; NAS, ). Consequently little is known about the careers of women in science outside the academy. European Platform of Women Scientists Learn more The voice of women scientists in Europe and beyond The European Platform of Women Scientists is an international non-profit organisation that represents the needs, concerns, interests, and aspirations of more than women scientists in Europe and beyond.

While more and more women are reaching senior levels in science and engineering, the aspiration of reaching gender equality is not yet fulfilled.

Data from the She Figures report, a major EU publication that presents Europe-wide data on women in science. Saturday we celebrate the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, and while this has been a remarkable year for recognition of women in science (hello, “Hidden Figures”) there are still hundreds of relatively-unknown women who have changed the world with their research throughout history.

Amid a global push to get more girls interested in science, engineering, technology, and. Only 3 % of Nobel Prizes for science have ever been awarded to women, and only 11 %* of senior research roles are held by women in Europe. As the world hurtles towards a future threatened by climate change and resource scarcity, the global scientific community must lose no time in recognising and promoting women scientists’ achievements.

Causse E. () Women in Science in Europe: EU Policies for the Promotion of Women Scientists and the Role of the European Platform of Women Scientists in Shaping Them. In: Dössel O., Schlegel W.C. (eds) World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12,Munich, Germany.

IFMBE Proceedings, vol 25/Author: Emmanuelle Causse. Women in Science and Technology – the business perspective If Europe is to become a real knowledge-based society, then it needs more researchers. We know that women are under-represented in research and this is particularly true in the business sector: the industry average is about 18%, despite the growing number of female university graduates.

The European Platform of Women Scientists EPWS is an umbrella organisation bringing together networks of women scientists and organisations committed to gender equality in research in all disciplines in Europe 27 and the countries associated to the European Union’s Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development.

The Platform welcomes researchers working in any discipline and working in science in its widest sense, ranging from natural to social sciences Headquarters: Brussels, Belgium. Logue convened the first EU seminar on 'Women in Science' in and jointly published with LM Telapessy 'Women in Scientific and Technological Research in the European Community', highlighting the barriers to women's advancement in the Research world.

[citation needed] Recent timesChildren: 3 (including Antonia). In Septemberthe European Commission published an open call for creating a European Platform of Women Scientists. The call was won by CEWS (Center of Excellence Women and Science) in Bonn, Germany, who signed the final contract with the Commission as sole contractor in February   Written by Ulla Jurviste and Anna Stull.

Inthe European Commission issued the communication “Women and Science: mobilising women to enrich European research”, which aims to promote equal opportunities in research activities in the was the first step towards a gender equality policy in the field.Research on women's participation in the "hard" sciences such as physics and computer science speaks of the "leaky pipeline" model, in which the proportion of women "on track" to potentially becoming top scientists fall off at every step of the way, from getting interested in science and maths in elementary school, through doctorate, postdoctoral, and career steps.

The leaky pipeline also applies in other fields.