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Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Rural development and fertility transition in South Asia found in the catalog.

Rural development and fertility transition in South Asia

Samuel S. Lieberman

Rural development and fertility transition in South Asia

the case for a broad-based strategy

by Samuel S. Lieberman

  • 86 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Population Council in New York, N.Y .
Written in English

    Places:
  • South Asia.
    • Subjects:
    • Rural development -- South Asia.,
    • Fertility, Human -- South Asia.,
    • Agriculture -- South Asia.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementSamuel S. Lieberman.
      SeriesWorking papers - Center for Policy Studies, Population Council ; no. 55, Working papers (Population Council. Center for Policy Studies) ;, no. 55.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD2065.3 .L53
      The Physical Object
      Pagination52 p. ;
      Number of Pages52
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4140612M
      LC Control Number80119020

      The future pace of fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa is the main determinant of future world population growth and will have massive implications for Africa and the rest of the world, not least through international migration pressure and difficulties in meeting the sustainable development goals. In this context, there have been concerns about recent stalls in the fertility decline in   South Asia (rural South India and Bangladesh) from the late s that demon-strated the inner workings of family farming. The progressive expansion of my concept of modes of production can be found in Caldwell (), “Towards a restatement of high fertility,” () “The economic rationality of high Transition/Demographic Transition Theory.

      Asia Pacific Observatory on Health Systems and Policies WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia World Health House Metropolitan Hotel Office Block Bangla Sahib Road, Gole Market, Sector 4 New Delhi, , India Telephone: + / Email: [email protected] The recent contribution by Moulasha and Rama Rao () to the debate on the relationships between religion, fertility and family planning, uses National Family Health Survey data in misleading ://

      Abstract. Migration and fertility are two of the main components of demographic dynamics. Both are individual or household-level responses to the chang- ing economic conditions that occur in urbanization industrialization, and higher returns to human capital :// According to their model, fertility decline happened earlier in urban areas not only because the desired number of children fell in response to a modernizing socialist economy before there were any official programs to limit fertility but also because voluntary birth control and abortion services were available; while in the rural areas there


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Rural development and fertility transition in South Asia by Samuel S. Lieberman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Between andfertility in South Asia fell from about 6 to births per woman. In Sri Lanka and South India, this transition started in the late s and childbearing has reached Get this from a library.

Fertility transition in South Asia. [James F Phillips; Zeba A Sathar;] -- This compendium of nineteen chapters, written by South Asia scholars and international authorities in the field of population, provides an overview of a range of issues surrounding fertility change   The paper empirically examines old-age security hypothesis to explain fertility rates in South Asia.

Panel data is used for the period – for seven South Asian countries which include Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The estimated results reveal that in South Asia fertility rate decreases with the increase in financial :// The viewpoints presented here provide a range of competing theories on the South Asia fertility transition, which will be of particular value to sociologists, historians, and all those interested in comparative research for the region.

The concluding section examines the role of policies in the South Asia fertility :// During the s, major policy debates on the role of mechanisation in agricultural and rural development in south Asia took place; by the early s, such debates had largely :// H.M.

Yousif, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 8 Conclusions. Fertility transition mirrors divergences in culture and development of the MENA countries.

Family values and traditions, social institutions, norms, ethnic divisions, religious beliefs, and all the various forces of modernization and development are reflected in the fertility 40Fertility in all the countries of South Asia was still high in the early s, ranging from children per woman in Sri Lanka to in Afghanistan (Appendix Table A.5).

At that time, fertility rates were comparable in India and Nepal ( and children per woman), substantially higher in Pakistan, Bangladesh and Bhutan ( Fertility Transition in South and Southeast Asia Fertility Transition in South and Southeast Asia Rammohan, Anu.

ASEAN Economie Bullet Vol. 21, No. 2 (), pp. ISSN Fertility Transition South and Southeast Asia Anu Rammohan This paper uses a combation of economic reasong with empirical evidence to review the fertility decle experienced South /fertility-transition-in-south-and-southeast-asia-ldrpztB0dp.

Fertility transition in South Asia edited by Zeba Ayesa Sathar and James F. Phillips (International studies in demography) Oxford University Press, For example, some countries in East Asia, North Africa, and Latin America already completed this transition, whereas other poor, rural, agrarian societies—primarily those in South Asia—are still in the early stage of this transition and continue with relatively high fertility rates (Bongaarts ; Gubhaju ) Inan influential book titled Population growth and economic development in low‐income countries: a case study of India's prospects by demographer Ansley J.

Coale and economist Edgar M. Hoover argued that economic development in Asian countries was constrained by high levels of fertility (Coale & Hoover ). At the time a large   FERTILITY TRANSITION, SOCIOECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OFTo understand the amazing decline in fertility–the average number of births per woman–in modern times, it is necessary to begin with an examination of high fertility in traditional societies.

Fundamentally, fertility was high, typically around five to seven births per woman, because of high death :// /fertility-transition-socioeconomic-determinants.

The chi- square result revealed a significant difference in sex preference in urban and rural areas (χ2 =df= 3, p-value = ). Also, the study shows that perpetuation of family lineage accounted for the major reason for male child preference in both urban (%) and rural Allan Ortega-Muñoz, Francisco D.

Gurri, Effect of Salaried Work in Cities and Commercial Agriculture on Natural Fertility in Rural Maya Women from the Yucatan Families in Southeast and South Asia, Annual Review of Sociology, Africa's Unique Fertility Transition, Population and Development Review, /j   development – and thus of urbanization – in fertility dec line 11 reaction s to diffusion theory and its view of the role played by family planning programmes in fertility de cline 13 4 Refocusing the role of urbanization in development and fertility decline 16 5 The factors underlying fertility change and   Fertility, Education and Development: Further Evidence from India ∗ Jean Drèze Mamta Murthi CDE, Delhi School of Economics CHE, King’s College Delhi Cambridge CB2 1ST (e-mail: [email protected]) (e-mail: [email protected]) 22 November, Abstract There has been a significant decline in fertility in many parts of India since the Downloadable.

Although the role of urbanization in fertility decline remains debated, few studies have assessed long-term fertility trends by urban/rural place of residence.

Relying on successive surveys for 55 countries, we analyze the diffusion of cohort fertility decline in urban and rural areas across Africa, Asia and Latin America and the :// The paper empirically examines old-age security hypothesis to explain fertility rates in South Asia.

Panel data is used for the period – for seven South Asian countries which include When the population grows no further, the demographic transition ends. Countries of the Western world went through this development during 19th- and 20th-century industrialization.

In the countries of the Global South, mortality rates fell rapidly in the s, but fertility started to decline at different points in time from region to :// In the South Asian region, Sri Lanka has nearly traversed the demographic transition (i.e., shift from high birth and death rates to lower birth and death rates as a country/region develops) and now has low mortality and fertility rates with the latter reaching replacement fertility.

Sekher, TV,"Fertility Transition: The Case of Rural Communities in Karnataka, India", 18th European Conference on Modern South Asian Studies, 6–9 JulyLund.

Download Guilmoto, C.Z. et al., (), Mapping out Social Change in South Lieberman, Samuel S.,Rural Development and Fertility Transition in South Asia: The Case for a Broad Based Str5ategy, Working Paper, Center for   An equally striking development is that by as many as 64 countries had fertility Kenya and Jordan are leaders in the fertility transition in their respective South-central Asia